Advertisement
Home Arts & Entertainment Originally published January 19, 2012

Wendy Williams Launches 'Save the Twinkie' Campaign Amid Hostess Bankruptcy Filing

by AFRO Staff

    Wendy Williams (Courtesy Photo)
Story Tools
Share |


Comments
There are currently 0 comments.

Be the next to make a comment.

Post a comment

Login|Register


AFRO Black History Archives
Check out related stories, research genealogies, or peruse all that our archives have to offer.

Click Here to get started!

Wendy Williams wants to make sure that one of America's favorite snacks stays around for generations to come.

That's why the TV talk-show host is spearheading a campaign entitled "Save the Twinkie," according to a recent news release. The new initiative comes weeks after Hostess Brands, the maker of the creamy cakes, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

"Like many, I've enjoyed the gooey goodness of Twinkies since I was a child," Williams said in a statement. "Right now, the iconic American symbol that drives our salivation is at risk of being depleted. We the people must take action. Embrace a box...or three. Don't be a ding dong, save the Twinkie!"

Williams plans to regularly promote the snack on her show to drive sales and consumption. Celebrity guests will receive custom gifts made of Twinkies, sample recipes created from the cakes, and share stories about their favorite Hostess snacks and food products.

According to the Associated Press, the Texas-based company headed into bankruptcy protection in early January and explained in its filing that three key problems are driving its financial troubles.

One issue is that its prime rivals have merged, heightening competition in the snack business. Also, Hostess employees are unionized, unlike many of its competitors' workers.

Another concern the company has is finding a place in many Americans' healthy lifestyle regimen. Data from the National Purchase Dairy Group (NPD) showed that there was an increase in healthy food consumption among Americans last year, compared to data in 2000, according to the AP.

Though the company listed about $860 million in debt, it will still be able to sustain routine operations thanks to a $75 million financing commitment from lenders led by a Connecticut-based investment firm.