Tuesday, March 17
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Find all of the AP’s virus outbreak coverage on Coverage Plan.

Happening Now
With borders slamming shut, schools and businesses closing and increasingly drastic restrictions on movement, tens of millions of people are heeding government calls to isolate themselves and slow the spread of the new coronavirus.

Shutdowns swept across the United States, with millions of people in the San Francisco ordered to remain in their homes much of the time even as spring break crowds flooded a Florida beach and dozens lined up to pose for pictures in front of the iconic “Welcome to Las Vegas” sign.

Stocks are opening broadly higher on Wall Street Tuesday, a day after plunging to their worst loss in more than three decades. The Dow industrials added 150 points, or 0.7%, a day after dropping nearly 3,000. Markets are continuing to whipsaw because of uncertainty over how badly the coronavirus will hit the economy.

People dressed up for St Patricks Day take a picture in Dublin city centre, Tuesday March 17, 2020. The St Patrick’s Day parades across Ireland were cancelled due to the outbreak of Covid-19 virus. For most people, the new COVID-19 coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, but for some it can cause more severe illness. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)

People dressed up for St Patricks Day take a picture in Dublin city centre, Tuesday March 17, 2020. The St Patrick’s Day parades across Ireland were cancelled due to the outbreak of Covid-19 virus. For most people, the new COVID-19 coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, but for some it can cause more severe illness. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)

Iran is one of the hardest-hit countries in the world in the coronavirus pandemic, with state television warning that the outbreak could kill “millions” if the public continues to ignore guidelines. Days of denials gave the virus time to spread as the country marked the 41st anniversary of its 1979 Islamic Revolution with mass demonstrations.

Governments across Europe are deferring tax payments, approving short-term unemployment schemes and paid sick leave to try to cushion the economic blow to businesses and blue collar workers alike from virus-containment measures. It is unclear whether that will be enough as waitresses and tour guides, hairdressers and hotel maids lose work.

The White House is proposing a roughly $850 billion emergency stimulus to address the economic cost of the new coronavirus.

Find full virus outbreak coverage here.

Sex for sale has long been a staple part of Berlin’s freewheeling nightlife, but amid concerns over the new coronavirus even the world’s supposedly oldest profession is being hit by a sudden slump.

The Democratic presidential primary is consumed with uncertainty after leaders in Ohio called off Tuesday’s election hours before polls were set to open to combat the spread of the new coronavirus.

Most of the more than $1 billion the NCAA made last year came from the men’s Division I basketball tournament. The cancellation of the tournament will cause the NCAA some red ink on its balance sheet this year but how much is hard to determine.

What’s Ahead
Upcoming by 11 a.m. Eastern/1500 GMT: On the fifth day after falling ill with the new COVID-19 respiratory disease, Karoline Preisler could finally breathe again without severe lung pain. But the 48-year-old was still very weak and ill, had slept only three hours at the isolation ward of a hospital in Germany. “I miss my children so badly, they miss me, and we all miss that we can’t hug each other anymore,” Preisler tells the AP.

Upcoming by 4 p.m. Eastern/2000 GMT: The people sickest with COVID-19 need mechanical ventilators to help them breathe but U.S. doctors worry that unless cases are curbed, a surge in patients could far outpace the supply. By one estimate, there are 200,000-plus machines available and almost 1 million U.S. patients who would need them. The AP’s full coverage plan here.

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Shelley Acoca
Global News Manager
T: 212-621-1600
Twitter: @ShelleyA

The Associated Press is an independent global news organization dedicated to factual reporting. Founded in 1846, AP today remains the most trusted source of fast, accurate, unbiased news in all formats and the essential provider of the technology and services vital to the news business. More than half the world’s population sees AP journalism every day.