Commentary

  • Has the U.S. Given up on School Desegregation?

    May 17th marked the 62nd anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision outlawing so-called separate but equal public schools. As usual, the annual anniversary of the Supreme Court decision prompts reflection and an examination of the status of school desegregation in the ...

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  • Trump’s List

    On Tuesday, Donald Trump released a list of 11 “potential Supreme Court justices” he might nominate should he become president.  All those listed are current judges; all are relatively young; all have solid conservative pedigrees.  A few are counterintuitive choices, like the Texas Supreme ...

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  • Why I Still Believe in Bernie: A Father’s Unshaken Hope

    Recently, I voted for Bernie Sanders as our next President. Why?  Well, I’m not a millennial.  I’m 40ish, a business law professor and CEO of a STEM nonprofit.  Yet, I support Bernie because he’s an underdog just like me. And how did I earn my underdog label?  The hard way: through a bitter ...

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  • Baltimore Needs More Poetry and Activism

    My biggest fear used to be dying and not being remembered. When I was little, I used to think that no one would notice if I was not around for long periods of time. Recently, that fear has shifted. My biggest fear now is living and having nothing to say through my poems and short […]

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  • Feminism: The New F Word

    In 2016 there is a new F word causing controversy in schools. Students are allowed to say it, yet not many of them know exactly what it means. In some ways, this is more harmful than the original F curse word whose place it has taken. A student at a nearby all-boys school wrote a […]

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  • Donald Trump and the Spectacle of Lying

    During his march to the Republican Party nomination, Donald Trump has repeatedly demanded that for the time being all Muslims should be barred from entering the U.S., making it a cornerstone of his campaign.  Then, last week, he declared that idea was “just a suggestion.”  Which ...

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  • Libraries Provide Community Outreach

    When Andrew Carnegie was a 17-year-old immigrant “working boy” in Allegheny City, Penn. (now Pittsburgh’s North Side) in 1853, he wanted to be able to borrow books to improve himself – but in the era of predominantly private libraries he was stopped by an annual $2 ...

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  • Lyin’ Donald Trump is the Biggest Liar

    When Senator Ted Cruise was running for president, Donald Trump, now the presumptive Republican nominee, enjoyed referring to him as “lyin’ Ted Cruise.”  At one rally, he said, “Lyin’ Ted Cruise – L-y-i-n-dash.” Actually, he should have said ...

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  • West Point Correct Not to Punish Fist-Raising Black Women

    I remember the first time I saw a Black raised fist. I was watching the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City and two Black athletes, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, raised their black-gloved fists and bowed their heads on the medal ceremony stand during the playing of the “The Star Spangled ...

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  • MALCOLM X, FROM THE SIDE VIEW

    Fifty-one years after his assassination and the publication of his autobiography, Malcolm X—who would have been 91 this week—has now earned his place in mid-20th century history, alongside Martin Luther King, Fidel Castro and other radical luminaries. Most see Malcolm X, also known as El-Hajj ...

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  • Pat Buchanan Explains White Fears Over Diversity

    Leave it to Pat Buchanan, a former Richard Nixon speechwriter, to summarize why Whites fear an increasingly diverse United States.  As MediaMatters documented, he appeared May 5 on NPR’s Morning Edition to rant about America no longer looks like the America of his childhood. NPR Host ...

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